Here are some of the things people are writing about us:

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  • 2015

    Shark Feeding Frenzy Provides Valuable Insight into Eating Habits

    A shark feeding frenzy caught on film by a documentary crew provides valuable insight into the poorly understood eating habits of one of the ocean's most fascinating creatures.

  • 2015

    Anantara offers guests a diving holiday with a difference: a Five-Day Marine Expedition

    Anantara Dhigu and Anantara Veli Resorts in South Malé Atoll, Maldives, are excited to announce they will be hosting a team of marine biologists from The Khaled bin Sultan Living Oceans Foundation (KSLOF) 26 October to 1 November 2015. Led by Chief Scientist Dr Andrew Bruckner, the team of four researchers will be conducting a Starfish Control and Removal program, known as SCAR.

  • 2015

    Adventures in Chagos (BIOT)

    This article, posted in the Scripps Institution Coral Reef Ecology blog, was written by Samantha Clements, a science team member on the Living Oceans Foundation's BIOT Mission earlier this year.

  • 2015

    Coral Bleaching Hits Indian Ocean Reefs

    Findings of bleached corals in the Indian Ocean from the Global Reef Expedition mission to BIOT were published on CBSNEWS.com.

  • 2015

    Global Reef Expeditions Assess Coral Reef Health

    Prince Khaled bin Sultan of Saudi Arabia had a dream: to fund research expeditions focused on the health of the ocean. The dream became reality when the Living Oceans Foundation was founded in California.

  • 2014

    Q&A with filmmaker Alison Barrat

    Alison Barrat’s film “Mapping the Blue” follows the story of the world’s largest marine park. The film is one of the entries in this year’s American Conservation Film Festival. Barrat lives in Maryland, near the Chesapeake Bay, and works for The Khaled bin Sultan Living Oceans Foundation.

  • 2014

    Life in the Great Barrier Reef

    Onboard the M/Y Golden Shadow, the Khaled bin Sultan Living Oceans Foundation is circumnavigating the globe to survey some of the most remote reefs on the planet. I recently joined their Global Reef Expedition, as a Fellow of the International League of Conservation Photographers (iLCP). My job was to take images to aid the science team as they surveyed the Great Barrier Reef (GBR)– the most well-known reef in the world.