Science Without Borders®

Science Without Borders®

Science Without Borders® is the overarching theme of the Khaled bin Sultan Living Oceans Foundation. It provides financial sponsorship of marine conservation programs and scientific research around the globe, and raises awareness of the need to preserve, protect and restore the world's oceans and aquatic resources.

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    Education

    Education

    • Our Coral Reef Ecology Curriculum is a great resource for students and teachers. Filled with lesson plans, videos, and interactive learning exercises, our education portal engages and inspires students to learn about coral reefs and to become stewards of this vital ecosystem.

    • The application period for the 2020 Science Without Borders® Challenge is now closed, but stay tuned to see the winning entries from this year's student art competition! This annual art contest encourages students to be creative while learning about important ocean science and conservation issues. The SWB Challenge is open to middle and high school students 11-19 years old, with prizes of up to $500 awarded to the winning entries.

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    #FactFriday: Most of the time, we think of sponges as the rectangular cleaning tool next to our sink, but did you know that sea sponges are actually animals? Most sponges are sessile, meaning that they can’t move. In order to eat, they must filter feed. Sponges have specialized cells that push water through their small pores to filter out plankton and other tiny organisms.

    Learn more #FunFacts on our #Education Portal: https://buff.ly/2TUgk8q

    Photo Credit: Badi Samaniego
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    Posted 3 days ago  ·  

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    #FactFriday: Sometimes being the smallest has its advantages. That is true for the genus of gobies called Bryaninops. These tiny fish have a commensal relationship with corals and other immobile animals. That means that the gobies do not harm the coral, but they benefit from the relationship. For example, many of the Bryaninops gobies are able to match the color of the coral to blend in with their environment. This camouflage helps the gobies to use their host as a place to hide from predators.

    Learn more fun facts on our Education Portal: https://buff.ly/2LSpbmp
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    Posted 1 week ago  ·  

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