Science Without Borders®

Science Without Borders®

Science Without Borders® is the overarching theme of the Khaled bin Sultan Living Oceans Foundation. It provides financial sponsorship of marine conservation programs and scientific research around the globe, and raises awareness of the need to preserve, protect and restore the world's oceans and aquatic resources.

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    Education

    Education

    • Our Coral Reef Ecology Curriculum is a great resource for students and teachers. Filled with lesson plans, videos, and interactive learning exercises, our education portal engages and inspires students to learn about coral reefs and to become stewards of this vital ecosystem.

    • We have announced the winners of our 2019 Science Without Borders® Challenge! Lesya Antoshkina from Ukraine is the winner of the high school category for her stunning artwork “The Bike We Ride,” which beat out fierce competition to take first place. The winner in the middle school category is Zeno Park from New Jersey, who at only 12 years old created the winning entry “The Place Where Fish are Free to Roam.” This international art competition is open to middle and high school students 11-19 years old, and we hope you consider applying next year!

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    Meet one of the world's most venomous snakes: The Sea krait.

    Sea kraits live in shallow coral reefs and mangroves, but come to land every 10 days or so, usually at night, to digest its food, engage in courtship, lay eggs, and slough its skin.

    We came across this sea snake while surveying the reefs of Tonga on the #GlobalReefExpedition. Although sea snakes are among the most venomous of all snakes, being 10 times more toxic than a rattlesnake, this one seemed fairly docile, paying little attention to us. We kept our distance though, as one snake produces 10-15 mg of venom, only a fraction of which is a lethal dose.

    #WorldSnakeDay
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    Posted 3 days ago  ·  

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    A movie comes out this weekend from Leonardo DiCaprio about the race to save the #vaquita porpoise, with special screenings in #NYC and #LA followed by talks from marine conservationists involved in the film. We had the chance to see the film at National Geographic headquarters in DC, and think it illustrates the complexities of trying to save a species, particularly one on the precipice of extinction (at last count, less than 30 vaquita remain in the wild).

    The film, SEA OF SHADOWS follows a team of dedicated scientists, high-tech conservationists, investigative journalists, and courageous undercover agents as well as the Mexican Navy as they put their lives on the line to save the last remaining vaquitas and bring the vicious international crime syndicate to justice.

    A looming disaster in one of the most spectacular environments on Earth sparks a rescue mission unlike any other in SEA OF SHADOWS, a riveting new documentary with the intensity of a Hollywood thriller from National Geographic Documentary Films and winner of the Sundance audience award. When Mexican drug cartels and Chinese traffickers join forces to poach the rare totoaba fish in the Sea of Cortez, their deadly methods threaten virtually all marine life in the region, including the most elusive and endangered whale species on Earth, the vaquita porpoise. SEA OF SHADOWS follows a team of dedicated scientists, high-tech conservationists, investigative journalists and courageous undercover agents as well as the Mexican Navy as they put their lives on the line to save the last remaining vaquitas and bring the vicious international crime syndicate to justice.

    #braceforimpactsos
    #seaofshadows
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    Posted 1 week ago  ·  

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    What on earth are these clownfish doing? Anemones have a powerful sting that can kill a fish. Clownfish rub themselves in the anemone to acclimatize their skin to the anemone, making them immune to the sting so they can hide from predators in the anemone. ... See MoreSee Less

    Posted 1 week ago  ·  

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