Announcing Our 11th Annual Science Without Borders® Challenge!

Written by

We are excited to announce that our Science Without Borders® Challenge is now open! This annual art contest inspires students from all over the world to be creative while learning about important ocean science and conservation issues. Last year, we asked educators and their students who participated in the contest for ocean conservation theme suggestions. There was one theme that repeatedly occurred in their answers – endangered species. We also think that this is an important topic to learn about, so for this year’s competition, we have selected the theme, “The Sixth Extinction.”

United Nations Ocean Decade Endorsed Action — Science Without Borders®: Conserving the Tropics

Written by

We are proud to announce that a project proposed by the Khaled Bin Sultan Living Oceans Foundation, Science Without Borders®: Conserving the Tropics, was endorsed by the United Nations as an official Ocean Decade Action. This prestigious endorsement from the Executive Secretary of …

This Earth Day, Celebrate our Planet’s Blue Heart

Written by

This Earth Day, we invite you to celebrate the blue heart of our planet: our oceans. The oceans produce half the oxygen we breathe, regulate our climate, sequester vast amounts of carbon, and even control the weather. The Khaled bin Sultan Living Oceans Foundation focuses on ocean conservation because we want to protect, preserve, and restore the health of our planet’s blue heart— our living oceans.

In 1969, the Cuyahoga River in Cleveland, USA caught fire. Not a boat on the river, or something in the water — the water itself had so much flammable waste dumped into it that it quite literally caught fire, garnering the attention of the entire nation. That same year….

United Nations Climate Change Conference COP26 and its Importance for Coastal Marine Ecosystems

Written by

This week, the United Nations Climate Change Conference COP26 is taking place in Glasgow, United Kingdom. This conference will bring together world leaders so they can address global climate policy and action, and assess the progress made to address climate change that was promised in previous years. The decisions made at this meeting could have lasting consequences for marine ecosystems, such as coral reefs, that are particularly sensitive to climate change.

The primary goals of COP26 are to secure global net-zero carbon emissions by mid-century and to adapt policies to protect communities and natural habitats. Net-zero carbon emissions does not mean no carbon will be released, but that any carbon emitted will be offset by other actions taken to remove it from the atmosphere.

Certain coastal marine ecosystems, such as mangrove forests, seagrass beds, and salt marshes, are particularly good at sequestering carbon by pulling it out of the air and storing it underground. Protecting and restoring these ecosystems (as we do in our Mangrove Education & Restoration Program) can not only conserve the marine environment, it can also help combat climate change. These ecosystems can also help coastal communities naturally adapt to other impacts of climate change by protecting the coast from storms, reducing erosion, and helping the shoreline keep up with sea level rise.

Scientific Collaboration on the Global Reef Expedition

Written by

To better understand the plight of coral reefs, The Khaled bin Sultan Living Oceans Foundation (KSLOF) launched the Global Reef Expedition (GRE), a 10-year research mission that circumnavigated the globe to address the coral reef crisis. And while the GRE trek covered over 53,000 km, perhaps the most impressive number is the hundreds of scientists, community leaders, government officials, educators, documentary filmmakers, and photographers who surveyed, mapped, and documented over 1,000 reefs in the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Ocean as well as the Red Sea.

The GRE also embodied the philosophy of Science Without Borders. In each country we were invited to work in, we brought an international team of scientists together with local leaders, conservationists, government officials, and subject matter experts to assess the state of the reefs. These local representatives provided invaluable knowledge and helped us share our findings with local communities. This philosophy allowed us to leverage the resources, commitment, and ideas necessary to make substantial progress to protect and preserve coral reefs.

Last chance to enter our student art contest, the Science Without Borders® Challenge!

There is still time to participate in our international student art competition, the Science Without Borders® Challenge! Submit your artwork by Monday, April 20 for your chance to win up to $500. 

This year the theme for the Science Without Borders® Challenge is “The Magic of Mangroves.” Mangroves are extremely important ecosystems that provide many benefits, such as coastal protection, nursery grounds, and habitat. For this year’s theme, we are asking students to create a piece of art that illustrates how mangroves are important. 

Difficult Times in Abaco

Written by

Although it has been an amazing year implementing the J.A.M.I.N. program, a piece of my heart has been swept away with Hurricane Dorian. For the past four years, I’ve been working in partnership with Friends of the Environment in Abaco, The Bahamas to implement our B.A.M. program at Forest Heights Academy and Patrick J. Bethel High School. By August 2019, we were in full swing, planning the first phase of the new academic year and discussing how we were going to celebrate our five-year anniversary. These plans came to a sudden halt when, on September 1, 2019, Hurricane Dorian wreaked havoc on the Abaco Islands.

Teachers Who Inspire

Written by

Each year I look forward to our Science Without Borders® Challenge. In addition to receiving such incredible artwork, I thoroughly enjoy collaborating with so many amazing educators from around the world who encourage their students to participate. Often, I get …