Welcome, Saskia! KSLOF welcomes a master’s student to study our Mangrove Education & Restoration Program

Written by

Six months ago, I was certain that I would be travelling to Indonesia to research mangrove crabs for my master’s thesis. The project was funded, and I was prepared to leave for Indonesia when suddenly, I received information that local fishermen could not catch enough crabs for me to conduct research. At such a late date, this was incredibly stressful news!

Around this time, I began to wonder if I could picture myself in the biological sciences or if I should make a step towards the field of social science. During my travels around the world, I was always interested (and often shocked) to observe the interaction between humans and nature. A few years ago, I travelled to southeast Asia to study whale shark populations. While studying these majestic creatures, I noticed the interactions occurring between tourists and the whale sharks. I had moments where I was frustrated, angry, and emotional, seeing whale sharks startle tourists who would fearfully kick and hit the whale sharks. Not only did I get angry at the tourists but at the local people working in this industry; however, after getting to know the locals and seeing their dismal economic situation, I began to think differently. I wanted to understand local people and their problems. I realized that in order to make a difference, you need to incorporate social sciences into environmental science, so that both can find a way to live in harmony.

A New Mangrove Conservation Program: Mangrove DEALs

Written by

In 2018, we partnered with Alligator Head Foundation to implement our Jamaica Awareness of Mangroves in Nature (J.A.M.I.N.) program in Port Antonio, Jamaica. Through this program, we have educated teachers and youth about the mangrove ecosystem. Although this initiative has …

Announcing 2021 Science Without Borders® Challenge Semi-finalists – Ages 11-14

Written by

The Khaled bin Sultan Living Oceans Foundation is delighted to announce the first round of semi-finalists for the younger category of students ages 11-14 years old, who participated in our 2021 Science Without Borders® Challenge. Each year we choose a different conservation focused theme for the contest. For the first time in its history, we chose a theme related to mangroves called “The Magic of Mangroves.” We asked students to create a piece of art that illustrates how mangroves are important.